A woman spraying perfume

How To Easily Remove Perfume From Skin

Perfume can be tricky to get off the skin. However, using a few simple methods can effectively reduce the smell and remove the perfume entirely.
Updated: November 9, 2022
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Perfumes come in a huge variety of fragrances. There’s nothing better than finding that perfect perfume that compliments a flawless outfit before a great night out. But, if you’re anything like me, sometimes you might get a little carried away with the spraying and overdo it.

Suddenly, you’re running around the house trying to figure out the best way to tone down the smell before your cab arrives outside. Luckily for you, we’ve got the solution! Read on to find out how to get perfume off skin.

How perfume works

Perfumes, as well as being an ever-popular consumer item, are actually quite an impressive feat of chemistry.

There are records that document perfume production and use all the way back in ancient civilizations. Back then, perfumes were strictly made with natural ingredients such as flowers, as the scientific techniques that we use today were an impossibility. Nowadays, perfumes are expertly crafted in laboratories by qualified chemists, and literally, millions of dollars can be spent trying to get that perfect scent.

Perfumes are produced by extracting oils from plants, before being dissolved in alcohol to create a highly concentrated perfume oil. This is then blended with all the other desired ingredients, then left to age for months on end like a wine to complete the final perfume. Quite an intricate process, but interesting nonetheless.

When perfume is sprayed on the skin, it sends signals to the brain via the nostrils, which is how you are able to recognize the odor.

Different perfumes have different levels of potency and strength and can stay on our skin for varying amounts of time.  If you want to make your perfume last longer, check out our article that discusses how long perfume holds onto the skin.

How to get perfume off skin

Going a little overboard on the perfume front is natural, and let’s be honest, we’re all guilty of it. But how do you get excess perfume off the skin? Is it simply a case of using soap and water? Here are our suggestions.

First, always rinse

Before we get to our potential solutions, you must rinse the perfume-polluted area of your skin thoroughly under lukewarm water for at least 60 seconds. Don’t grab a sponge and begin scrubbing, and no, don’t use soap either, as these things probably won’t do much good. The long rinse however will prime the skin for the following methods, and increase their chances of success.

Olive oil

Olive oil can be an effective way of removing that unwanted perfume smell from the skin. Olive oil is highly concentrated and can act as a great cleanser. Simply pour some on a cotton pad, and rub over the skin in a circular motion. Keep this up for a few minutes and see if the smell is losing potency. While results may vary, many people report success with this technique.

Vodka

Believe it or not, vodka can help reduce and mask the smell of perfume on the skin. Use unflavoured vodka for this job, and again, rub it on the skin with a cotton pad for several minutes. Then, take a shot, because why not?

White vinegar

Vinegar can be a powerful cleaning tool. Rub some white vinegar into the skin with a cotton ball, topping it up every now and then, before leaving it to sit on the surface of the skin for about 10 minutes. Afterward, gently rinse with lukewarm water over the sink or in the shower to get rid of the perfume from the skin.

Conclusion

That’s it! Easy peasy. Getting too excited about a new perfume happens to us all. Thankfully, removing excess perfume from the skin is simple and time efficient.

Give the methods above a try, and before you know it you’ll be out the door and enjoying the night.

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